Our Guest Editor Anoushka Silva explores wedding beauty rituals fit for the modern bride

'When my sister asked me to research wedding beauty rituals that she wanted to incorporate in her wedding preparation to me a natural place to start was India. A country which has always inspired me on so many levels, historically, culturally, and with many beauty rituals as bold and colourful as the country itself. 

The vastness of India and its differing communities bring many a varied practice. In some places it is even common for both the bride and groom to undergo some of the rituals together; which to me seems like a wonderful way to start a life journey together.

 

A common ritual is the preparation of an intricate mix that cleanses, purifies and enhances the skin. Made from readily available ingredients including sandalwood, turmeric and RoseWater that are specially selected for their own unique properties. Sandalwood (locally known as Chandan) makes me recall my early days in Sri Lanka, treasuring a piece of sandalwood bark which I would grind away on a rock into a fine powder, mix with water and make a paste and apply to my face. Sandalwood has been used from time immemorial by both men and women to eliminate blemishes, rashes and blackheads

   

Turmeric (Haldi) is added, a traditional antiseptic which can improve skin tone, reduce pigmentation, clear excess sebum and impurities, rashes and facial hair growth. Rosewater (Gulabjal) is used as the binder in the cleansing mix which helps to relax the skin and tone it. It is also used by the bride’s family as they sprinkle it to welcome the groom’s arrival.

 

The spice of Gods and the ultimate glow.
Kesar, or saffron, is a golden colour spice and is also used as part of wedding rituals. Saffron milk is known to be drunk by the bride and groom on the night of their wedding owing to its ability to purify the blood making your skin glow. Saffron comes from the stigmas of the eponymous crocus flower. It offers a golden glow like no other and is deemed a luxury ingredient. It is one of the rarest and most expensive spices in the world and it helps to treat dry skin. In India it is revered as a spice of the gods and a symbol of good luck, holiness and purity.

 

Some Indian practices will involve the bride sitting in front of four diyas, or oil lamps, so that the glow from the lamps is reflected on her face leaving her glowing on her special day. Delving deeper into this world I then discovered the ultimate in beauty rituals; the ‘Solah Shringar’. A ritual steeped in ancient Indian culture.

The literal translation of 'Solah Shringar' is '16 adornments that a bride carries to adorn her beauty'. What a divine concept, which extols sixteen basic steps for the beautification of a bride from head to toe. It is deemed a beauty ritual not to be missed for a bride’s look would not be complete without it.

 

Solah Shringar is a ritual steeped in ancient Indian culture and is meant to bestow gifts of beauty on a bride to be. It also celebrates the beauty and divinity of the female form. There is a belief that certain ornaments and embellishments enhance the beauty of a woman giving her a celestial appearance. When adhering to the Solah Shringar, the ceremony will commence with divine bath of the bride known as the pre-shringar. Here, local aromatic oils are applied to a bride’s hair. The hair is then washed with a mix of herbs such as Brahmi, Shikakai, Aloe Vera, Bhringraj, and Amla. An enhanced version of the cleansing mix that in addition to the turmeric, sandalwood and rose water includes oil, milk, gram flour and some fragrant herbs is applied on a bride’s hands, arms, legs and face. This is akin to a face and body scrub and is known in India and Pakistan as Ubtan or Uptan. It is the women closest to a bride will make this paste and apply it to her face and body along with music and singing.  The result is radiant, aromatic skin.  To prepare a simple variation of this that you can try at home, take:

1 teaspoonful of Besan (chick pea powder or gram flour)

1 teaspoonful of Sandalwood powder

½ teaspoonful of Red lentil powder

1 teaspoonful of lemon Juice

¼ teaspoonful of Turmeric powder

Milk or rose water

Mix all the ingredients into a paste and rub into the skin. You can either give yourself a gentle massage with it or simple let it dry on its own. After some time, wash off with lukewarm water to reveal a bright glowing skin.

The Solah Shringar is head to toe attention to detail. Through these sixteen rituals there are guidelines on hair arrangements, make up - Kajal a black eyeliner which is meant to highlight and accentuate a brides beautiful eyes; to jewellery - nose rings, ear rings, necklaces, armlets, and bracelets.

Mehndi or Henna plays a large part in many Indian but also African and Middle Eastern wedding rituals. Both feet and hands are covered with intricate designs and in Asian cultures the red colour is considered to be auspicious because it has several emotional, sexual and fertility-related qualities. It is also common for the groom’s initials to be etched into the intricate design to which he is asked to find amongst. 

I have been truly inspired by these wonderful bridal beauty rituals, that can as easily be translated into my everyday beauty ritual'. 

Anoushka

xx
Photo credit: All images by Signe Vilstrup for Vogue India November 2013

8 comments

What an interesting and insightful read. Anoushka has a very exciting and enticing way of writing which draws you in! I look forward to making her glow recipe, it was a great addition to the story.

Hakema kharoti August 25, 2015

What a great article. Brings back many memories of the Hindu rituals I went through when I got married. I’m also familar with the face/skin rub made with Chick Pea flour (I use to apply this to my skin during my spotty teenager days as advised my by mother). Termeric is a wonderful spice which also has health benefits too as it contains curcumin, a substance with powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. x

Sheila Mistry August 18, 2015

Very interesting article not only relevant to a bride-to-be but for anyone looking for more healthy, glowing skin. I’m inspired to attempt to make the Solah Shringar myself and maybe even try it out on my boyfriend too! I look forward to hearing about more tips from Anoushka

Rachael August 18, 2015

My girlfriend is a huge fan of the Sable Beauty site and is always remarking about the amazing curated products. It is a great site for gift ideas and she will love this new additional feature to the site. With an upcoming wedding, the wealth of information will be a great read for her. Do hope there will be more features like this to come from Anoushka.

Daniel Williams August 18, 2015

An in depth insight and who’d have thought that todays modern store cupboard ingredients yield such glowing results when mixed and applied to ones skin!

Natasha Silva August 18, 2015

Great read – very inspiring and educational to understand what rituals different cultures still practice in the modern day… Some would be great to try, just for fun!!

Chevita August 17, 2015

Good tips but I stopped reading halfway through.

Tessia Silva August 17, 2015

Great article for someone about to get married any a real eye opener for things my partner and I can do together that is way left field for us. Thanks for this and I look forward to her next piece.

Jared Rigby August 17, 2015

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